And That’s Exactly Why You Should Start

This is me at the start of my fitness journey.

The first year I trained hard, but not very much: 30–40 minutes 3–4 times a week. Let’s call that 2 hours per week. I trained probably 45 weeks of the year. 90 hours total.

This is me roughly 6 months into year one:


Eh…probably.

There’s nothing wrong with being normal in any aspect of life, and that certainly holds true with ones approach towards physical fitness and exercise. However, if you want extraordinary results, don’t fool yourself into thinking that normal methods or an average mindset will produce them.

They won’t. And anyone selling that is lying to you.

Here are five signs that you are a normie lifter. If you feel offended or attacked by this article, you probably are one. There’s nothing wrong with that. But if you want to change that status, you might want to level up your training game.

#1 You Aren’t Constantly Learning


They Exist, But You’ve Already Found Them

The teardrop of the quad. The long head of the biceps. The upper chest. The “upper lat”. The medial head of the triceps. The rhomboids.

All very important muscles. All of them can be preferentially targeted with certain movements.

But should you?

The biceps has two heads.

Both act on the elbow to flex it, and also assist in raising the arm overhead by acting on the shoulder. You can get slightly more activation of one or the other by manipulating your arm position or even the load, such as holding a dumbbell off-center.

But should you try to emphasize…


The Strong Case Against It, Too

Picture a barbell squat in your mind. You walk up to the bar, the heavy load resting on either side of it taunting you. You take a deep breath, get under the bar, position it carefully, brace your core hard and lift it out of the rack.

Where is the bar?

Typically speaking, it’s on your upper traps, or a “high bar” back squat position.

Some people prefer a “low bar” position, where the bar is a bit further down on the rear delts, and the torso is more inclined.

But how many of you envisioned the bar resting on…


Perhaps We Can All Learn From This

Recently while maxing out on the incline bench press, bodybuilder Ryan Crowley suffered a massive pec tear. It was one of the worst I’ve ever seen.

The Tear Itself

To set the stage a bit: Ryan Crawley was training with Larry Wheels, one of the strongest powerlifters on the planet who also has a truly massive social media following. They started out with the incline bench, gradually warming up and adding plates.

Larry Wheels did four plates (180kg) for an incredible seventeen reps, then Ryan did the same weight for seven reps, with the eighth being a long and agonizing effort, which Larry…


20 Lifting Longevity Tips

Let’s get right into it. The vast majority of people have goals that are the following:

  • Increasing strength
  • Gaining muscle
  • Losing fat

That’s probably 80–90% of people. Very few people even think of longevity. Even elite athletes generally aren’t thinking of how they’ll be performing and feeling in a decade or two. Just the next competition.

Here are twenty tips to maximize your gym experience in the long term — something there is astonishingly little information about online.

Respect The Iron

If you see a jacked older guy in the gym, watch how he trains. I mean, don’t be creepy about it or…


The Good, the Bad, and the Dangerous

Some people say that you should never do cheated reps, while other people swear by them. Perhaps these are both sources of fitness information that you trust.

What to do?

Well, first it’s important that context and details matter. Hopefully by the end of reading this article, you’ll have a deeper understanding of why cheated reps can be both good and bad, as well as how to use them in your training — if at all.

What is a cheat rep?

Like a bodybuilding show, it’s important to have definitions. A cheated rep is a rep that uses muscles other than the primarily targeted ones…


From Sh*t to Superb

YouTube fitness content is extremely varied — the tagline for this article isn’t an exaggeration at all. You can find fake gurus who over promise, cite made-up studies, have zero actual experience, prescribe downright dangerous exercises and gain followers through dramatic clout-chasing self-aggrandizing antagonistic and inflammatory videos built to merely get clicks.

You can also find some of the best sources of free fitness information on the web. People who teach you how to logically set up a training plan or inspire you to push harder towards your own goals. …


As essential as it gets

The Bulgarian split squat, the movement that feels like hell, but delivers heavenly results. Out of all the exercises that one can do, no other begets such a love-hate relationship from so many people. But you should do them, even if they suck.

Reason #1: Stabilization and Balance

Lifting on one leg, unsurprisingly, requires quite a bit more stabilizing and balancing by the lower body, and the “core” as well. This is something just about everyone feels the first time they try this movement, and it’s not a bad thing at all.

If starting out, you can hold onto something to help you balance, but…


A decade ago, this was barely a thing

I slowly open my eyes, blinking slightly in the morning light, wiping away the eye crust that always follows that extra hour of work past midnight that shouldn’t even exist in the first place.

I stretch my arms once and swing my legs out of bed, gingerly, oh-so-gingerly, feeling the Bulgarian split squats from two days before quite acutely. Opening the curtain, opening the window, opening the bathroom door, opening my bladder then opening my computer follow, and I start the day of work, my fifty foot commute complete.

Emails, client responses, Quora notifications, YouTube comments, Medium notifications, Instagram messages…the…

Geoffrey Verity Schofield

Hi! Just a guy from Quora who lifts and writes about it. Online personal trainer based in Shenzhen, China. New to Medium…and writing. www.fitttle.com

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